Jan 16–May 20, 2021

Human scale remeasured

New spatial requirements, societal demands and economic values in architecture
Address
Christinenstrasse 18-19, 10119 Berlin Map
Hours
Tue-Fri 11 am–6:30 pm, Sun-Mon 1–5 pm

The exhibition, curated by ANCB The Aedes Metropolitan Laboratory, presents exemplary built projects and outstanding conceptual models by architects and planners from all over the world. These proposals are the results of a new way of thinking in which cities, built living spaces and working environments are not only designed and realised in an ecologically sustainable way, but also implemented with the objective of restoring a social and economic balance. HUMAN SCALE REMEASURED offers new visions for the built environment concerned with a better socio-economic coherence.

The exhibition demonstrates how 15 selected architecture and urban projects and 10 academic contributions from international universities can initiate a positive change by targeting challenges holistically and implementing approaches accordingly.


With the exhibition, ANCB proposes a solution-oriented contribution to the discussion that our way of life is losing its measure in overwhelming expansions and short-sighted decision-making.


In light of the current crisis, there is a growing sense of responsibility among architects, urbanists, researchers and economists worldwide to use their knowledge to develop designs and models for new spatial requirements, societal demands and economic values: measured to the human scale. Worldwide emergencies, such as climate change, pandemics, but also rapid growth, social and global inequalities and migration waves, demonstrate the urgent need to reduce the impact of urban life on resources, from the scale of the individual to an international approach. The momentum of the current crisis also leads, besides hardship and struggle, to constructive reflections on new concepts and typologies for living, learning, working and leisure beyond short-term economic profit in order to instigate social, infrastructural and ecological change.